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August 2017

Review: The Twentieth-Century Crisis, Unit 4 of Jackson Spielvogel’s World History: Modern Times

One of the main problems with Spielvogel’s World History: Modern Times is a lack of balance. Unit four of the textbook focuses on the 31-year period from 1914-1945. Within this densely-packed unit, three of the four chapters focus primarily on Europe. The rest of the world, including the United States (surprisingly) is discussed briefly, if at all.

August 2017

Review: Boom and Bust, Unit 6 of Joyce Appleby’s The American Vision

The American Vision falls short of many important historiographical trends. Political history, or more accurately Presidential history, is important for students to learn—our democratic government operates (or is at least supposed to) on a legalistic basis. But history is a discipline that at its best seeks to understand the human experience. It studies human beings doing things. A more comprehensive textbook would necessitate more space be given to history “from the bottom up.”

August 2017

Review: Imperialism and Progressivism, Unit 5 of Joyce Appleby’s The American Vision

The period covered by Unit 5 of Joyce Appleby’s The American Vision textbook goes from 1890 to 1920, an era characterized by conflicts large and small, and varying ideas of what it meant to be ‘modern.’ The narratives presented here run very closely to those in a college-level survey, with numerous useful primary sources for students to examine. However, both of the unit’s major themes – imperialism and progressivism – come across as inevitable forces in history.

August 2017 Recent Installments in the Series

Sifting through the Madness: Navigating the Academy as a Black Woman PhD Student

In a sense, I knew what I was getting into. I entered well-aware of the institutional, systemic norms that have precluded Black women from doing this work and creating knowledge that seeks to disrupt many of the corrupt, perverse, misguided myths about who we are and what we have done. My awareness, though, has not made my short journey less arduous.