Author: William Horne

William Horne, Associate Editor of The Activist History Review, writes about the relationship of race to labor, freedom, and capitalism in post-Civil War Louisiana. His research interests include systems of power revolving around concepts of race, labor, incarceration, capitalism, and the state. He is a former high school teacher, barista, and warehouse worker and is an avid home gardener. His dissertation, “Carceral State: Baton Rouge and its Plantation Environs Across Emancipation,” examines the ways in which white supremacy and capitalism each depended on restricting black freedom in the aftermath of slavery. He holds a PhD in history from The George Washington University and can be followed on Twitter at @wihorne.
March 2017 Spotlight On: Race

Bring Back Our Jobs: Work, Machines, and Energy Infrastructure

Sometime in the late 1930s, Irene Robertson interviewed Mary Teel about her memory of slavery and her life since. Some of Robertson’s questions clearly made the formerly-enslaved Teel feel uncomfortable, like when she asked about the Klan, education, and voting. Nonetheless, Teel’s account of slavery and its aftermath repeated a theme common among her peers: years of hard work still left her “hard up.”

January 2017 Top Stories

Unthinkable Obamacare

As the death of Obamacare looms like a grim reaper over so many of us with preexisting conditions, lower incomes, or non-traditional forms of employment (Uber, anyone?), it seems worthwhile to examine some the primary obstacles to public acceptance of the Affordable Care Act (ACA/Obamacare).